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Sunday, 27 July 2014

Eid Mubarak












Eid Mubarak or Blessed Eid (Arabic: عيد مبارك‎, Bengali: ঈদ মোবারক, Persian/Urdu: عید مُبارک, Malayalam: ഈദ്‌ മുബാറക്‌, Somali: Ciid wanaagsan, ஈத் முபாரக்) is a traditional Muslim greeting reserved for use on the festivals of Eid ul-Adha and Eid ul-Fitr. Eid means "Celebration" and refers to the occasion itself, and Mubarak means "blessed"; for example: "Eid Mubarak, sister!"
Muslims wish each other "Eid Mubarak" after performing the Eid prayer. The celebration continues until the end of the day for Eid ul-Fitr (or al-Fitr) and continues a further three days for Eid ul-Adha (or Al-Adha). However, in the social sense people usually celebrate Eid ul-Fitr after Ramadan and Eid-ul-Adha in the month of Dhul Haj(12th and Final Islamic month), visiting family and exchanging greetings such as "Eid Mubarak". This exchange of greetings is a cultural tradition and not part of any religious obligation.



In much of South Asia, Eid Mubarak wishes are very common and often accompanied by hugging three times after the Salat al Eid. In the Philippines, it is recognized as a legal Holiday, though the greeting of Eid Mubarak is gaining traction only recently. In Turkey, where 'Eid Mubarak' is not common, the synonymous phrase "Bayramınız mübarek olsun" is used instead, along with its more Turkicized counterpart, "Bayramınız kutlu olsun", both meaning exactly the same: "May your holiday be blessed". Along with Turkish people, the Bosnian Muslims also commonly say "Bajram Šerif Mubarek Olsun", the response is "Allah Raziola". Another common Eid greeting by Bosnian Muslims is "Bajram Barečula". In Pashtun areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan, the Pashto Akhtar de nekmregha sha, meaning "may your festival be blessed" is common. Speakers of Arabic might also add "kul 'am wantum bikhair", which means "[May] you be well every year". In Indonesia, the most common expression is "Selamat Idul Fitri", Idul being an Indonesian name for Eid and Fitri for al-Fitr; whereas in Malaysia it is "Selamat Hari Raya Aidilfitri", Aidilfitri being the Malay transliteration for Eid ul-Fitr.
Throughout the Muslim world there are numerous other greetings for Eid ul-Adha and Eid ul-Fitr. The companions of Muhammad used to say to each other when they met on Eid ul-Fitr: Taqabbalallâhu minnâ wa minkum (which means "[May] God accept from us and you [our fasts and deeds]").

Chaand Raat 2014












Chaand Raat (Hindi: चाँद रात; Urdu: چاند رات; Bengali: চাদ রাত, [Chaad Raat]; literally, Night of the Moon) is a Hindi, Urdu locution used in Pakistan and India for the eve of the Muslim festival of Eid ul-Fitr; it can also mean a night with a full moon
Chaand Raat is a time of celebration when families and friends gather in open areas at the end of the last day of Ramadan to spot the new moon, which signals the arrival of the Islamic month of Shawwal and the day of Eid. Once the moon is sighted, people wish each other Chaand Raat Mubarak ("Have a blessed night of the new moon") or Eid Mubarak ("Blessings of the Eid day"). Women and girls decorate their hands with mehndi (henna), and people prepare desserts for the next day of Eid and do the last round of shopping.
City streets have a festive look, and brightly decorated malls and markets remain open late into the night.[1] Chaand Raat is celebrated festively and passionately by Muslims (and occasionally non-Muslims as well) all over South Asia, and in socio-cultural significance, this night is comparable to Christmas Eve in Christian nations.


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